Myhomecare Doubles Workforce with 300 New Healthcare Jobs

Press Release

Myhomecare Doubles Workforce with 300 New Healthcare Jobs

95% of New Roles Will Be Homecare Nurses

Myhomecare is doubling its workforce through the creation of 300 jobs as part of a major recruitment campaign. This campaign was created in recognition of the high level of demand in the home care space, especially this winter.

Established in Dundalk, Louth in 2006 by Servisource Recruitment (part of the CPL Group), Myhomecare currently employs over 220 staff nationwide, which include homecare workers and administrative staff.

Out of the 300 new jobs, over 95% of them will be homecare positions, homecare assistants or homecare nurses, all of which will be flexible carer roles. The campaign will be recruiting for these varied positions across the 26 counties of Ireland.

Pictured L-R: Myhomecare Clinical Nurse Manager Susanne Kelly, Tánaiste Leo Varadkar, Myhomecare CEO Declan Murphy, Myhomecare Operations Manager Deirdre Doyle

Speaking on Myhomecare’s job creation campaign, Tánaiste Leo Varadkar said

“This is an incredible expansion by Myhomecare, doubling its workforce and creating 300 new jobs. These additional homecare nurses and assistants will make a big difference to countless people and families up and down the country, allowing those with additional needs to stay in the comfort of their own home.”

It will of course also take some pressure off of hospitals, by allowing people to return home and be looked after there, rather than in a hospital. Congratulations to the team involved.
Tánaiste Leo Varadkar

“From my own previous experience as a healthcare assistant, I understand the impact and responsibility these roles bring. It is such a rewarding career knowing that we are making a difference in the lives of those most vulnerable in our community.”

We are extremely excited to welcome 300 additional healthcare professionals into the Myhomecare family, doubling our existing workforce to over 520 nationwide.

says Myhomecare Operations Manager Deirdre Doyle.

Senator John McGahon endorsed Myhomecare’s campaign saying,

“It is fantastic to see local Louth company Myhomecare creating 300 incredibly valuable jobs across Ireland. Supporting our elderly community in continuing a safe and independent life in their own homes is something we should always strive for and these new roles will certainly assist in achieving this.”
Senator John McGahon

Myhomecare is a HSE recognised national supplier of homecare. Their homecare services have been designed to assist expecting mothers, babies, and young and older adults from birth to retirement and beyond.

Myhomecare are the only home care sector in Ireland that currently holds the International Gold Seal in quality by JCI, joining an exclusive group of 24 Homecare companies globally. This accreditation demonstrates the excellence in service delivery from the Myhomecare team and their dedication to their staff, clients, and their families.

Photo Accreditation to Conor Matthews Photography.

Want to join the Myhomecare team?

If you are caring and compassionate, then take the first step and click ‘Join now’. We are looking for people like you to join our winning homecare team!

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